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Sunday, December 10, 2006

Orwellian Newspeak: Failure Is Success.

We were able to obtain the following rough draft of remarks that were addressed to President Caputo at the last WFC meeting.

*********************************************************

We welcome the opportunity to raise with you the issue of the, shall we call it rambling preamble, response of the board.

We are not bothered by the fact that Chairman Bianco disagrees with our views as much as we are troubled by the tone, contents and lack of depth that his analysis shows.

Allow me to explain: Only earlier today I had a rather heated debate with a few colleagues regarding the 2007 prospects for the US economy. I spoke of a hard landing another colleague spoke of a soft landing. Such disagreements are fine. That is what makes a horse race. But then a third person jumped in to say that all is fine, $ is strong, deficit is under control, the economy is healthy ... Now that is a view that is totally disconnected with the facts and with reality if you will. It is delusional and based on wishful thinking.

Please convey to Chairman Bianco our total and utter dismay with the tone of his response which can be best described as an exercise in Obfuscation

Denial

Misattribution.

The response is an attempt to by pass responsibility for the dire financial straights of the University by attributing what it calls a minor short term enrollment problem to miscommunication. Miscommunication and lack of transparency have aggravated the issue but did not cause it.

The trigger was the increase in tuition fees coupled with tuition guarantees on top of the misallocation of resources (Time, effort and capital) on non core peripheral programs in addition to the granting of excessive unjustified compensation packages to senior officers.

The best evidence that the board is grasping for straws in it attempts to defend the indefensible and justify the mismanagement practices is demonstrated by the logic employed. They had no choice, given the lack of real measurable accomplishments, but to resort to fuzzy, ambiguous purely subjective issues, chief among them is the shepherding of Pace University through the 9/11 trauma. What does that mean? Did Pace implement policies that helped it avoid the fate that had occurred at other similar institutions in this region? I do not recall that any such institutions went under or even came close to that. I must ask again:

What is it that was so special and extraordinary about the way that Pace handled 9/11 that demands so much commendations? I am not of the opinion that individuals require special thanks in the performance of their everyday routine duties.

Then we learn that the President was the guiding force behind the modest Fulbright record. Mind you, this achievement, according to the board, did not only happen under his watch but occurred because of his watch. This is nothing short of the biggest fallacy in logic. (An eclipse is scared away by people beating on empty tins). What was the role of the President in this?

Furthermore, the accomplishments of the winners not withstanding, Pace‘s record in Fulbright was not as distinguished when it is compared objectively to the list of other Fulbright productive schools.

Then there is the most vital of issues that is conspicuous by its absence, the financial quagmire in which the University finds itself in. This is neither short term nor market related. It is not an issue of barely missing a target but instead missing a set objective by a mile, the result of this miss is best reflected in:

Large annual deficit for years to come.

Deficit manifests itself even in a cash crunch.

Shrinking net worth

Ballooning debt

Weaker Bond rating

Weaker financial ratios

Make no mistake about it none of the above was preordained. We chose it. It was all self-induced. All the above were simply the result of institutional misguided and wrongheaded policies.

Despite all the above plus the failure to grow the endowment over a period of six years and in addition to the inability to move forward on the issues articulated by the management team itself in its strategic plan 2003-2008 the board pronounces such failure as success and decides that those responsible for all the missed targets and the creation of these existential problems ought to be rewarded with better pay packages. This is nothing short of Orwellian Newspeak.

25 Comments:

At 9:56 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

tp end it now you now have the inteeligence to do it so do it

 
At 12:26 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"The time has come," the Walrus said,
"To talk of many things:
Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
Of cabbages--and kings--
And why the sea is boiling hot--
And whether pigs have wings."

 
At 12:28 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot.
Thomas Paine

 
At 12:30 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong gives it a superficial appearance of being right.
Thomas Paine

A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.
Thomas Paine

An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot.
Thomas Paine

Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... Horrid mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them.
Thomas Paine

Belief in a cruel God makes a cruel man.
Thomas Paine

But such is the irresistable nature of truth, that all it asks, and all it wants is the liberty of appearing.
Thomas Paine

Character is much easier kept than recovered.
Thomas Paine

Every science has for its basis a system of principles as fixed and unalterable as those by which the universe is regulated and governed. Man cannot make principles; he can only discover them.
Thomas Paine

From such beginnings of governments, what could be expected, but a continual system of war and extortion?
Thomas Paine

Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.
Thomas Paine

He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from opposition; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach himself.
Thomas Paine

Human nature is not of itself vicious.
Thomas Paine

I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our fellow-creatures happy.
Thomas Paine

I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.
Thomas Paine

If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace.
Thomas Paine

If we do not hang together, we shall surely hang separately.
Thomas Paine

 
At 12:31 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Japenese proverb
Fear is only as deep as the mind allows

 
At 12:41 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong gives it a superficial appearance of being right.
Thomas Paine

A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.
Thomas Paine

An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot.
Thomas Paine

Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... Horrid mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them.
Thomas Paine

Belief in a cruel God makes a cruel man.
Thomas Paine

But such is the irresistable nature of truth, that all it asks, and all it wants is the liberty of appearing.
Thomas Paine

Character is much easier kept than recovered.
Thomas Paine

Every science has for its basis a system of principles as fixed and unalterable as those by which the universe is regulated and governed. Man cannot make principles; he can only discover them.
Thomas Paine

From such beginnings of governments, what could be expected, but a continual system of war and extortion?
Thomas Paine

Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.
Thomas Paine

He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from opposition; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach himself.
Thomas Paine

Human nature is not of itself vicious.
Thomas Paine

I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our fellow-creatures happy.
Thomas Paine

I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.
Thomas Paine

If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace.
Thomas Paine

If we do not hang together, we shall surely hang separately.
Thomas Paine

It is necessary to the happiness of man that he be mentally faithful to himself. Infidelity does not consist in believing, or in disbelieving, it consists in professing to believe what he does not believe.
Thomas Paine

It is not a field of a few acres of ground, but a cause, that we are defending, and whether we defeat the enemy in one battle, or by degrees, the consequences will be the same.
Thomas Paine

It is the direction and not the magnitude which is to be taken into consideration.
Thomas Paine

Lead, follow, or get out of the way.
Thomas Paine

Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.
Thomas Paine

 
At 1:46 PM, Blogger Thomas Paine said...

To All Readers,
In less than 48 hours a JFC meeting will be held at the graduate center in WP. If you really care about what is happening at Pace then you have to attend and make your views known. This might go down as the decisive meeting in handling the current crisis.

 
At 8:55 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

tp ,,,,,,,,,,you have presented the case.........their defense was pathetic.........only question is grad center the right venue............DO NOT LET THIS DRAG ON........RW MAY CHANGE HIS MIND

 
At 8:56 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.

 
At 8:56 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"The time has come,"

 
At 3:28 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

After having opted for so many incompetent external Presidents, VPs, Deans, Assoc deans and even our resigning provost, who in many ways never worked his way up the faculty career ladder here at pace but to have tunneled up through it politically, let us identify a stellar faculty from within with promising pontential for this job of Provostship.

Also, let us avalanche into his so called Chat on line dog and pony show with the El-Pres King tomorrow wednesday at 12:00 and just tell him to step down to save Pace..

 
At 5:52 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

NEXT PROVOST should not have enrollment management reporting to them. we need a jack schiff type to be THE VICE PRESIDENT. The new president should be off campus 75% of the time telling the Pace story and raising money.

 
At 6:05 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

A motion of no confidence, also called a motion of non-confidence, a censure motion, a no-confidence motion, or simply a confidence motion, is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. On rare occasions, it may also be put on the parliamentary order paper by an erstwhile supporter who has lost confidence in the government. The motion is passed or rejected by means of a parliamentary vote (a vote of no confidence). In the British Parliament it generally first appears as an early day motion although the vote on the Queen's Speech also constitutes a Confidence Motion

 
At 6:53 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"In some ways, he had enormous potential and political gifts. But, they didn't arise because of his lack of discipline,"

 
At 7:04 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

king.....................PLEASE READ PLEASE PRETTY PLEASE.
KNOWING WHEN TO LEAVE
Finally, it's important to know when to exit gracefully. You'll know that time has come when
• Students no longer have a quick response to the question, "What are the three things you like best about your university?"
• You change the subject when you are asked what you like best
about your job.
• The faculty senate doesn't notice that you've missed three meet-
ings in a row.
• You have to introduce yourself to students even though there are
pictures of you in just about every institutional publication.
• Staff don't show up for recognition dinners.
• Your most loyal assistant avoids making eye contact with you.
• Your board provides a Yugo as your "company" car.
• You wake up to the realization that you have no plan.
• Your reputation is for defending your programs rather than creat-
ing new ones.
• You invite yourself to an alumni club meeting only to find it's been canceled for lack of interest.
• You sit down at an official function and no one rushes to fill the seat next to you.
• You feel tired all the time.
• You find yourself thinking that this would be a great place if there weren't all these students, faculty, and staff around.
• You don't feel the need to explain a controversial decision.
• You plan your vacations without looking at your campus and external obligations.
• You don't consult witkothers because you've begun to believe you always know what's best.
• Your key staff stop coming to you with important problems.
• You decide that your team has been together so long that performance reviews are no longer necessary.
• You forget to return the board president's call even after three insistent messages.
• You find you've spent the day with spinach caught between your front teeth and no one has thought to point it out to you.

 
At 8:34 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

king BEGONE,,...,,/.;',,• You don't feel the need to explain a controversial decision.

 
At 8:39 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

It is now time for the University Board to recognize that the “blank check” it issued to the Administration has led only to a deepening of the crisis, with no resolution in sight. Further escalation can very well lead to additional arrests, reprisals against students, faculty, and staff, and even mass exodus of

 
At 9:36 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

In Tuition Game, Popularity Rises With Price


By JONATHAN D. GLATER and ALAN FINDER
Published: December 12, 2006
COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. — John Strassburger, the president of Ursinus College, a small liberal arts institution here in the eastern Pennsylvania countryside, vividly remembers the day that the chairman of the board of trustees told him the college was losing applicants because of its tuition.

Skip to next paragraph
Enlarge This Image

Shea Roggio for The New York Tmes
At Ursinus College officials determined that tuition was too low to draw enough students. So they raised it, and applications surged.

Multimedia
Graphic
Increasingly Expensive, but Similarly Priced

It was too low.

So early in 2000 the board voted to raise tuition and fees 17.6 percent, to $23,460 (and to include a laptop for every incoming student to help soften the blow). Then it waited to see what would happen.

Ursinus received nearly 200 more applications than the year before. Within four years the size of the freshman class had risen 35 percent, to 454 students. Applicants had apparently concluded that if the college cost more, it must be better.

“It’s bizarre and it’s embarrassing, but it’s probably true,” Dr. Strassburger said.

Ursinus also did something more: it raised student aid by nearly 20 percent, to just under $12.9 million, meaning that a majority of its students paid less than half price.

Ursinus is not unique. With the race for rankings and choice students shaping college pricing, the University of Notre Dame, Bryn Mawr College, Rice University, the University of Richmond and Hendrix College, in Conway, Ark., are just a few that have sharply increased tuition to match colleges they consider their rivals, while also providing more financial assistance.

The recognition that families associate price with quality, and that a tuition rise, accompanied by discounts, can lure more applicants and revenue, has helped produce an economy in academe something like that in the health care system, with prices rising faster than inflation but with many consumers paying less than full price.

Average tuition at private, nonprofit four-year colleges — the price leaders — rose 81 percent from 1993 to 2004 , more than double the inflation rate, according to the College Board, while campus-based financial aid rose 135 percent.

The average cost of tuition, fees, room and board at those colleges is now $30,367. Many charge much more; at George Washington University, the sum is more than $49,000.

But aid is now so extensive that more than 73 percent of undergraduates attending private four-year institutions received it in the school year that ended in 2004, not even counting loans.

“We can cushion the sticker shock,” said Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania, which distributes aid on the basis of financial need. “We focus on both middle-income and low-income families.”

So net prices vary widely on a given campus. On some, as many as 90 percent of students receive support, primarily from the college itself or the federal government.

And financial need is not the only basis for it. Many colleges, competing for the students with high grades and standardized test scores that help a college rise in rankings guides, offer merit aid ranging from a few thousand dollars to a full scholarship.

But officials of private colleges and universities say they fear that unless other steps are taken, the middle and upper middle class could ultimately be squeezed out.

“Eventually, if we’re going to keep raising tuition at rates much more than the increase in family incomes, then something has to be done to make the places more accessible to the middle class,” said Ronald G. Ehrenberg, director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute.

As it is, some students may not even apply to private colleges, scared away from the start by tuition and unaware of the available discounts. After all, tuition and fees at public colleges and universities — though growing recently at a faster pace than those at private institutions — remain vastly lower, at an average of $5,836, the College Board says.

It can be argued that everyone studying at a private liberal arts college is getting a discount. At institution after institution, officials say they offer an education costing tens of thousands of dollars more than even the college’s “sticker price.”

Take Swarthmore, the elite college half an hour’s drive from Ursinus. With an annual budget of $106 million to educate just under 1,500 undergraduates, Swarthmore spends about $73,690 a student. But its tuition, room, board and fees in the last academic year were little more than $41,000.

“The half of our student body whose families are paying the full sticker price are paying $41,000 for something that costs $73,000,” said Suzanne P. Welsh, the treasurer. “So they’re getting a great discount.”

The other students receive a bigger subsidy: on average, aid totaling more than $28,500, most of it from the college itself. (Swarthmore limits its aid to students with financial need, but that can mean those from families earning $150,000 a year if, for instance, there are circumstances like having multiple children in college.)

What makes it all work is Swarthmore’s $1.3 billion endowment, which throws off enough income to cover 43 percent of the operating budget.

 
At 9:42 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

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Published: December 12, 2006
(Page 2 of 2)



The biggest expenditure at liberal arts colleges is for salaries and benefits. With competition for big-name professors becoming more intense, faculty salaries have increased. So has the pay of college and university presidents, more than 100 of whom now receive at least $500,000 a year.

Skip to next paragraph


Multimedia
Graphic
Increasingly Expensive, but Similarly Priced
Enlarge This Image

Shea Roggio for The New York Tmes
At right, students at Swarthmore, where tuition and other costs in the last academic year surpassed $41,000 — a bargain, administrators say.
Then there are the amenities sought by students: coffee bars, lavish new dormitories, state-of-the-art science laboratories and fitness centers.

“You’re trying to create the best educational experience for your students, and that costs money,” said Tom Tritton, president of Haverford College. “I sometimes say to parents, ‘I can make it cheaper if you want.’ ”

Still, none of this explains why colleges like Swarthmore and Ursinus — with different student-faculty ratios, endowments and reputations — end up with tuition and fees only a few hundred dollars apart, or less. Or why Harvard’s tuition and fees, at $33,709, are virtually the same as theirs.

One big reason is that institutions of higher learning watch one another.

In November, the finance committee of Swarthmore’s board of managers gathered at a Manhattan law firm and pored over a chart of tuition, room and board at more than 30 prestigious colleges and universities. They were pleased to see that Swarthmore was charging somewhat less than most of its competitors.

That kind of scrutiny led Bryn Mawr to a contrary sentiment, causing the college to raise tuition and fees this year by about 9 percent, their biggest jump in several years. Bryn Mawr officials say they made the decision after their research showed that the college charged less than its rivals and awarded more aid. The officials concluded that raising tuition would not deter applicants, because prospective students already assumed that Bryn Mawr cost the same as comparable colleges.

“The question was, Does that make sense?” said John Griffith, Bryn Mawr’s treasurer and chief financial officer. “Have we benefited at all from being the low price point? And the answer was no.”

Some of the nation’s bigger institutions have also found an incentive to raise prices. As part of an effort to improve its academic offerings and transcend its renown for football, the University of Notre Dame has raised tuition and fees by an inflation-adjusted 27 percent since 1999, to $32,900. In setting tuition, Notre Dame watches 20 other colleges and universities, including the University of Chicago, Emory and Vanderbilt.

“We’re setting it by our competitors,” said the Rev. John I. Jenkins, the institution’s president.

But Notre Dame’s financial aid has increased even more over the same period, with undergraduate scholarships up 107 percent after adjustment for inflation. This year the university is distributing $68 million.

Facing stiff competition, Hendrix College, a small liberal arts institution in Conway, Ark., decided two years ago to bolster its academic offerings, promising students at least three hands-on experiences outside the classroom, including research, internships and service projects. It also raised tuition and fees 29 percent, to $21,636. Most of the increase went back to students as aid.

As a result, 409 students enrolled in the freshman class this year, a 37 percent increase.

“What worked was the buzz,” said J. Timothy Cloyd, the Hendrix president. “Students saw that they were going to get an experience that had value, and the price positioning conveyed to them the value of the experience.”

Other colleges have tried the opposite. Muskingum College in New Concord, Ohio, cut tuition and fees drastically in 1996, to $10,285 from $14,240.

“We believed that if we lowered tuition, we would open access to the middle class” and “that we would continue to serve the higher socioeconomic-background students by becoming a best-buy institution,” said Anne C. Steele, Muskingum’s president.

Revenue increased, with enrollment of more students who could pay full price. Muskingum has also grown, to 1,600 undergraduates from about 1,000.

Yet the same strategy proved disastrous for North Carolina Wesleyan College. Ten years ago that college cut tuition and fees by 22 percent, to $7,150. But it attracted fewer wealthy applicants and more poor ones, who needed more aid even as the revenue generated from tuition declined.

“It didn’t work out the way it had been hoped,” said Ian David Campbell Newbould, the college’s president. “People don’t want cheap.”

But they do apparently want a deal, or at least the perception of one. Lucie Lapovsky, a consultant who was once president of Mercy College in New York, conducted a study asking students to choose between a college charging $20,000 and offering no aid, and one charging $30,000 and offering a $10,000 scholarship. Students chose the pricier option.

“Americans seem to like college on sale,” Dr. Lapovsky said.

Many administrators say that without raising prices, they could not maintain or expand economic diversity among the student body. In other words, making college more expensive for some enables less well off students to go.

But Brian Zucker, president of the Human Capital Research Corporation, a consulting firm that works with colleges, is suspicious of that argument, particularly given the growth of merit aid. He points out that many middle-class students borrow tens of thousands of dollars to attend liberal arts colleges and that at some, they may be helping defray the cost of a merit scholarship to a wealthier applicant.

“It’s not a given that the subsidy is going in any predetermined direction,” Mr. Zucker said. “We don’t know.”

TOMORROW: Students, recent graduates, college presidents and others talk about whether they think a private college education is worth its cost.

 
At 9:48 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

THANK YOU GREAT POSTS MUST READING FOR ALL

 
At 10:53 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

GRANT, JOANNE - Confrontation on Campus: The Columbia Pattern for the New Protest
........tp you know her can she help ?

 
At 10:55 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

please sign up............................................................Individuals Against the Crime OF silence........................................................................................

 
At 10:58 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

tp do not know if Sander johnson Esq. is still around?

 
At 1:28 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Who's afraid of the big bad wolf
Big bad wolf, big bad wolf?
Who's afraid of the big bad wolf?
Tra la la la la

Who's afraid of the big bad wolf
Big bad wolf, big bad wolf?
Who's afraid of the big bad wolf?
Tra la la la la

Long ago there were three pigs
Little handsome piggy-wigs
For the big, bad very big very bad wolf
They didn't give three figs

Number one was very gay
And he built his house of hay
With a hey hey toot
He blew on his flute
And he played around all day

Number two was fond of jigs
And so he built his house with twigs
Heigh diddle-diddle
He played on his fiddle
And danced with lady pigs

Number three said "Nix on tricks
I will built my house with bricks"
He had no chance
To sing and dance
'Cause work and play don't mix

Ha ha ha! The two little
Do little pigs just winked and laugh, ha ha!

Who's afraid of the big bad wolf
Big bad wolf, big bad wolf?
Who's afraid of the big bad wolf?
Tra la la la la

Who's afraid of the big bad wolf
Big bad wolf, big bad wolf?
Who's afraid of the big bad wolf?
Tra la la la la

Came the day when fate did frown
And the wolf blew into town
With a gruff "puff-puff" he puffed just enough
And the hay house fell right down

One and two were scared to death
Of the big bad wolfie's breath
"By the hair of your chin-ny-chin,
I'll blow you in"
And the twig house answered yes

No one left but number Three
To save the piglet family
When they knock
He fast unlocked
And said "Come in with me!"

Now they all were safe inside
And the bricks hurt wolfie's pride
So, he slid down the chimney
And, oh, by Jimney
In the fire he was fried

Ha ha ha! The three little
Free little pigs rejoice and laughed, ha ha!

Who's afraid of the big bad wolf
Big bad wolf, big bad wolf?
Who's afraid of the big bad wolf?
Tra la la la la

Who's afraid of the big bad wolf
Big bad wolf, big bad wolf?
Who's afraid of the big bad wolf?
Tra la la la la!

 
At 1:35 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced "snick")...............................tp can you round up the gang?

 

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